Worst 5 Padres draft picks of the 2000s

Matt Antonelli of the San Diego Padres (R) tags out Xavier Paul of the Los Angeles Dodgers (L/#75) sliding into second base during the second Major League Baseball game in China on March 16, 2008 at the Wukesong Baseball Stadium in Beijing, venue for the 2008 Olympics baseball event. Some 11,890 fans saw the second game of a two-game series between California rivals, with the San Diego Padres defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-3. Both teams are using only a half dozen players who will be on the opening day 25-man roster. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)
Matt Antonelli of the San Diego Padres (R) tags out Xavier Paul of the Los Angeles Dodgers (L/#75) sliding into second base during the second Major League Baseball game in China on March 16, 2008 at the Wukesong Baseball Stadium in Beijing, venue for the 2008 Olympics baseball event. Some 11,890 fans saw the second game of a two-game series between California rivals, with the San Diego Padres defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 6-3. Both teams are using only a half dozen players who will be on the opening day 25-man roster. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images) /
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The San Diego Padres typically don’t make the best selections in the annual MLB draft. Though they have made some great picks, they’ve made several bad ones that weren’t worthwhile.

The Padres have invested a lot of money in some draft picks that didn’t end up playing in MLB at all. Other players played very short careers that didn’t go far.

These five players stand out as the worst Padres draft picks of the 2000s.

2001 — Padres select Jake Gautreau in Round 1, Pick 14

Jake Gautreau was drafted by the Padres in 2001 in the first round as a third baseman with a $1.875 million bonus. He was drafted from Tulane University. However, he never played an MLB game.

He played his last minor league season in 2007 at the Triple-A level. Throughout his minor league career, he hit .255/.326/.426 for an OPS of .752. He seemed to show promising potential at the beginning of his career in the minors, but he lost steam toward the end.

During his first ever minor league season in 2001 at the High-A level, he hit .309/.389/.517 for an OPS of .906. In his last season at Triple-A, he hit .226/.250/.363 for an OPS of .613. Despite not having a career in MLB, he stuck with baseball and helps develop young prospects.

Gautreau is now a D1 assistant baseball coach at Mississippi State University.

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