San Diego Padres: Jurickson Profar better come ready to compete in Spring Training

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jurickson Profar #23 of the Oakland Athletics connects for a single during the sixth inning against the Texas Rangers at Ring Central Coliseum on September 22, 2019 in Oakland, California. The Rangers defeated the Athletics 8-3. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jurickson Profar #23 of the Oakland Athletics connects for a single during the sixth inning against the Texas Rangers at Ring Central Coliseum on September 22, 2019 in Oakland, California. The Rangers defeated the Athletics 8-3. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images) /
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Jurickson Profar #23 of the Oakland Athletics. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
Jurickson Profar #23 of the Oakland Athletics. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images) /

Is it Projar’s job to lose?

I definitely think going into Spring Training that the second base job is Jurickson Profar’s to lose.

They didn’t trade for him and pay him that much to not at least let him start the season as the team’s primary second baseman. So unless he gets injured or falls flat on his face this Spring, the job is his.

But he’s not getting paid enough that his leash won’t be short. If any of those others players I mentioned show out in Spring and do well when they get the chance to start the season, and Profar doesn’t perform, we’ll get a change at second rather quickly.

Another thing to keep in mind as I briefly touched on in the last slide, is that Profar can play a lot of different positions.

And really, a lot of the Padres’ players have the ability to play multiple positions.

Manager Jayce Tingler has a lot of options to make sure he keeps the hottest bats in the lineup every day.

If Hosmer is struggling and Profar and Cronenworth are hot, then you put Profar at first and Cronenworth at second.

This team has a lot of versatility going into 2020, which is great.

But going back to Profar, when you compare the numbers from 2018 to 2019 it really just does come down to luck. Again, the BABIP is really the only difference from those two seasons.

You have to safely figure that BABIP will go back up and his numbers will go back his career norms, which is a .240/.320 guy with 15-20 home runs, an OPS around. 700, and 2 WAR.

Next. 3 remaining questions before ST. dark

Those still aren’t numbers to get all excited about, but it’s a very solid season for someone hitting down in your lineup.

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